Jewellery: Maths and Computing

The jewellery for the new maths and computing section of the Suffrage Science scheme emerged through creativity, but also through competition.

In the space of just a few weeks, design students researched, designed and constructed prototypes of their jewellery pieces. They were inspired by themes such as beauty, simplicity and the search for ‘truth’ in mathematics, and the worlds of secret codes and machine language of computer science, as well as drawing on research into the history of the Suffragette movement.

The designs were then judged by CSC director Amanda Fisher and the organisers and advisors for the new section. Two winners and ten runners up were selected.

Winners

The main element of Veronika Fábián’s brooch (right), gold punched tape, reflects the fields of mathematics and computing, as well as conveying messages from the Suffragette movement, according to Fabian. Punctured tape was originally used by computer scientists to send text-based messages, and later for storing data. Decoding the series of holes on the brooch reveals sentences from three Suffragette banners; ‘Deeds not words’, ‘Courage Constancy Success’, ‘Through thick & thin we n’er give in’ and the phrase ‘Suffrage Science Award 2016’.

The brooch is an elegant piece with a powerful message. Even at first glance it makes a statement: “the gold stands for achievement and victory while the purple, white and green stones refer to the Suffragette movement,” says Fábián. She added delicate and meaningful details, such as gemstones, to make the brooch feel precious to the awardees.

Image of winner #1

‘Pattern of Thought’, designed by Veronika Fábián

Designer Emine Gulsal drew inspiration from this to create a bracelet with a secret gold message. Engraved on the inside curve, and hidden beneath a layer of silver, is what many mathematicians consider to be the most beautiful of all mathematical equations: ei π + 1 = 0.

“Over time, the silver plate will wear away from repetitive movement to reveal the beauty of the equation, which lies close to the wearers’ skin,” says Gulsal. “The concept of the equation revealed over time reflects the hardship of the Suffragettes, and what they had to go through in society to help to secure the right for women to vote. It also celebrates the achievements of women today.”

Image of winner #2

‘Mathematical Beauty’, designed by Emine Gulsal

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Jemma Bowers

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Hannah Cochrane

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Yayun Fang

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Gabriella Goldsmith

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Lydia Hartshorn

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Eloise Kramer

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Skylar Long

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Yihong Lu

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Michelle Lung

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Louis Tamlyn